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New Mystery

New Mysteries March 2010

Aunt Dimity Down Under by Nancy Atherton
From the Ground Up by Sandra Balzo
Sherlock Holmes: the American Years edited by Michael Kurland
Spies of Sobeck by P.C. Doherty
Man From Beijing by Henning Mankell
Split Image by Robert B. Parker
Fantasy in Death by J.D. Robb
Night too Dark by Dana Stabenow
Fifth Servant by Kenneth Wishnia
Death Without Tenure by Joanne Dobson
Corpse on the Cob by Sue Ann Jaffarian
Falconer's Trial by Ian Morson
City of Dragons by Kelli Stanley
Bellfield Hall by Anna Dean
Corpus Delecti by Keith McCarthy
Hasta la Vista, Lola by Misa Ramirez

New Mysteries February 2010

Merry Wives of Maggody by Joan Hess
Blacklands by Belinda Bauer
Wild Penace by Sandi Ault
Snow Angels by James Thompson
Doors Open by Ian Rankin
Thereby Hangs a Tail by Spencer Quinn
Butter Safe Than Sorry by Tamar Myers
Mist Over the Water by Alys Clare
Fourth Assassin by Matt Beynon Rees
Assassins of Athens by Jeffrey Siger
Gone 'til November by Wallace Stroby
No Mercy by Lori Armstrong
Death of a Valentine by M.C. Beaton
Parisian Prodigal by Alan Gordon
Whisper to the Living by Stuart Kaminsky
Paganini's ghost by Paul Adam
Treasure Hunt by John Lescroart
Unbearable Lightness of Scones by Alexander MCall Smith
Double Black by Wendy Clinch
Raining Cat Sitters and Dogs by Blaize Clement
Wings of Sphinx by Andrea Camilleri
Death by the Book by Lenny Bartulin
Wicked Craving by G.A. McKevett
Butterflies of Grand Canyon by Margaret Erhart
Silencer by James W. Hall

Mystery Monday

Pity the poor first time author!  After years of painstaking writing and re-writing, possibly years of rejections, somehow a book is published.  It will be reviewed, publicized, and ordered by bookstores and libraries.  Now what?  Does it remain hopefully on the shelf, while its better known brethren (yes, you Janet Evanovich and Mary Higgins Clark) are eagerly snatched up?  Is the author's creation doomed to languish on the shelf, unread, ignored, and eventually discarded?  As the librarian who orders the mysteries, I struggle between satisfying enormous popular demand for bestsellers, and purchasing the quiet, well-reviewed gems which the public may not even notice.  To rectify this situation, I want to take this opportunity to introduce some authors who have just published their first mysteries and deserve a wide readership. Try one today!

New Mysteries January 2010

Writ in Stone by Cora Harrison

Crawlspace by Sarah Graves

Art of Deception by Elizabeth Ironside

Poisoning in the Pub by Simon Brett

Desert Lost by Betty Webb

Fell Purpose by Cynthia Harrod-Eagles

Improving the Silence by Peter Turnbull

Red Velvet Turnshoe by Cassandra Clark

Faces of the Gone by Brad Parks

Tragedy at Two by Ann Purser

Mrs. Malory and Any Man's Death by Hazel Holt

Sew Far, So Good by Monica Ferris

Sting of Justice by Cora Harrison

Faces in the Pool by Jonathan Gash

Catered Birthday Party by Isis Crawford

Full of Money by Bill James

December Mysteries

Stuff to Die for by Don Bruns

Mirror and the Mask by Ellen Hart

Winter of Secrets by Vicki Delany

Rumpole Christmas by John Mortimer

Dial H for Hitchcock by Susan Kandel

Red. Green or Murder by Steven Havill

Village of the Ghost Bears by Stan Jones

Council of the Cursed by Peter Tremayne

Holiday Grind by Cleo Coyle

What Remains of Heaven by C.S. Harris

Dead Hand of History by Sally Spencer

Morning Show Murders by Al Roker

Bryant and Mays on the Loose by Christopher Fowler

Mrs. Jeffries and the Yuletide Weddings by Emily Brightwell

Mystery Monday

Why do we read mysteries?  If you are reading this blog, it can be assumed that you like mysteries.  An interesting thread on Librarything discussed why people read mysteries, and there were some interesting theories.

1. We love to see people being punished for their evil deeds, and generally, mysteries accomplish this with the guilty being punished, or at least, arrested.

2. We love puzzles, figuring thngs out, and mysteries certainly contain puzzles.

3. Many mystery writers are superb at characterization, as well as plotting, and are just some of the best writers around.

4. In a long running series we become invested in our favorite characters like Stephanie Plum, Peter Decker and Alan Banks.

5. Mysteries explore the mind and actions of people who do terrible things and it satisfies our need to understand the human condition.

Do any of these reasons resonate with you?  Maybe you just like to settle in with any engrossing book and here are a few you mignt want to check out.

Monster in the Box by Ruth Rendell.  Inspector Wexford returns and we get some intriguing looks into his past.

New Mysteries for November

Loot the Moon by Mark Arsenault

Jigsaw Guilt by Jeffrey Ashford

Death Message by Mark Billingham

Where's Billie? by Judith Yates Borger

For Better, For Murder by Lisa Bork

Tower by Ken Bruen

Tragic Magic by Laura Childs

Rude Awakening by Susan Cooper Rogers

Sink Trap by Christy Evans

All the Lonely People by Geraldine Evans

Murder She Wrote: A Fatal Feast by Jessica Fletcher

Trick or Treat by Kerry Greenwood

Ninth Daughter by Barbara Hamilton

Fingers of One Foot by Gerald Hammond

Stuff to Spy For by Don Bruns

Wyatt's Revenge by H. Terrell Griffin

Dead Reckoning by Claire Lorrimer

Cadger's Curse by Diane Gilbert Madsen

Monster in the Box by Ruth Rendell

Fool There Was by Betty Rowlands

Killer Crab Cakes by Livia J. Washburn

Shades of Grey by Clea Simon

In the Blood by Fay Sampson

Criminal Tendencies edited by Lynne Patrick

Drunkard's Path by Claire O'Donohue

Price of Malice by Archer Mayor

Chinese Whispers by Peter May

Huckleberry Finished by Livia J. Washburn

Darkest Room by Johan Theorin

October Mystery Books

Lost Art of Gratitude by Alexander McCall-Smith

Sheer Folly by Carola Dunn

Disappearance at Pere-Lachaise by Claude Izner

Yard Dog by Sheldon Russell

Deadly Descent by Charlotte Hinger

Inspector Ghote's First Case by H.R.F. Keating

Hardball by Sara Paretsky

Duty to the Dead by Charles Todd

Skull Duggery by Aaron Elkins

Arctic Chill by Arnaldur Indridason

Brutal Telling by Louise Penny

All My Enemies by Barry Maitland

Murder in House by Veronica Heley

New Mysteries for September 2009

Whack 'n' Roll by Gail Oust

Spackled and Spooked by Jennie Bentley

Sew Deadly by Elizabeth Lynn Casey

Stop This Man by Peter Rabe

Inked Up by Terri Thayer

Dead Man's Wharf by Pauline Rowson

Deadly Habit by Andrea Sisco

New Mystery Books for August 2009

Dead of Winter by Rennie Airth

DeKok and the Mask of Death by A.C. Baantjer

6 Killer Bodies by Stephanie Bond

Blood Lines by Kathryn Casey

Slice of Murder by Chris Cavender

Rotten to the Core by Sheila Connolly

Riesling Retribution by Ellen Crosby

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