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The Gothic Audiobook

In the mood for a really good novel with a spooky feel ?  Picture a beautiful yet sinister mansion, with a dark secret and an actor (usually with a British accent) reading you a tale fraught with drama, suspense and passion.  I thought you wanted that!  Whenever I read a review that uses the word “gothic”, or says “reminiscent of Daphne du Maurier’s, Rebecca”, the title immediately goes on my listening list.  Take a look at the list below and you will soon be hooked to the gothic audiobook, too!

Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier
The Thirteenth Tale by Diane Setterfield
A Reliable Wife by Robert Gadrick
The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde
Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte
The Woman in White by Wilkie Collins
The Historian by Elizabeth Kostova

Mystery Monday

The death of an author does not necessarily mean the end of a beloved series.  If the series has been successful, publishers will not let a little thing like the author's demise be a hindrance. A new writer is chosen, his or her name with be relegated to a tiny font while the title reads something like Robert Ludlum's Jason Bourne in the Bourne Legacy by ... Saddled with a clunky title, the book will nevertheless sell briskly to those who are eager for more time with these cherished characters. My favorite example of a writer who appears to trump death by writing from the grave is the trademarked V.C. Andrews.  After her death in 1986, her family "wanted the torch to continue" and chose a writer to carry that torch.  The writer, Andrew Neiderman, has been unbelievably prolific and has kept her  many fans happy over the years.

Let's Talk About Libraries

In honor of National Library Week, the American Library Association put together this great video. It contains quotes by famous people about the importance of libraries. Enjoy!

Video: 

National Library Week is Coming

One week a year, libraries across the country sit back and bask in the spotlight. The focus is on National Library Week, and this year it is April 10 through 16. At the New City Library you will want to check out some of the fun activites we have planned. Community businesses are supporting us with great prizes. Several stores will give 10% discount at the time of purchase. You will need to show your New City Library card. Those participating stores are:

                Anna's Bakery in Congers                    

                Back To Earth - New City Store (good for supplements)

                New City Florist in New City

                Rhoda's Cafe in New City

It was something like...

It's funny how the mind works.  Picture this: you're having lunch with your best friend.  A few weeks ago, you finished a book that you absolutely LOVED, and you think she'd really like it, too.  But now that you have the opportunity to recommend it to her, you find that a few key details (like the book's author and title) have slipped your mind.  You can wax rhapsodic about the plot.  You can remember the color of the dress the heroine is wearing on the cover, and you remember her name-- Rose.  (Or maybe it was Violet?  A flower, anyway.)  You know she has an eccentric older relation.  You sit there wracking your brains, feeling a little embarrassed over your lapse, and assure your friend that you're almost positive the word "Scoundrel" is somewhere in the title... or maybe it was "Scandal"?  (If you're a regular romance reader, you're probably laughing in pained sympathy by now.)  Anyway, you got the book from the library; you're sure the librarian could help her find it.  (Librarian's answer: "Maybe?")  Sound familiar?  I can assure you, you are NOT alone in this difficulty.

Parenting Series: Nursing Knowledge

During the month of April, there will be a series of Monday morning programs concerning breastfeeding issues for new parents and expectant mothers. All aspects of the process will be reviewed along with secondary concerns such as returning to work and storage guidelines. Qualified counselors and personnel wiil be available at the sessions. Meet and discuss your concerns with other mothers and get your questions answered. Each session begins at 10 AM and ends at 11:30 AM.

2! 4! 6! 8!

Who do we appreciate!?

It’s the Pages! Did you ever stop to think about how all our books, magazines and audio books are shelved? Every day our Page staff puts away just about all the books returned that day and new items sent up by our Technical staff. Each item on our browsing shelves was put there by a Page. It is their responsibility to shelve non-fiction according to Dewey Decimal numerical order, fiction alphabetically by the author’s last name, and biography alphabetically by subject. If an author has several books then the titles need to be alphabetized. Did you know numbers go before words in a title? As an example when searching the author James Patterson, the title ‘4th of July’ is shelved before ‘Cross,’ and ‘Cross’ is shelved before 'Four Blind Mice.' If there is more than one author with the same last name, books are shelved alphabetically by last name, first name. Each author’s titles are then put in alphabetical order. Did I lose you yet?

Not Just for Teens

Most adult readers regard "teen" literature as something to be avoided, since they are "children's" books.  I once had a customer  request a particular book she had seen in Barnes & Noble.  She was really excited about reading it, however when I said that the book was in the Teen Room, she quickly said she didn't want it.  I couldn't persuade her to change her mind.  Many teens, especially Clarkstown teens, can and do read on an adult level.  Teen books usually indicate that the marketing department of a publishing house thinks the book will sell more copies if it is marketed to teens.  In the past several years, I've seen some teen books become wildly popular with the general public, such as The Book Thief by Markus Zusak or The Boy in the Striped Pajamas by John Boyne and all the books by Stephenie Meyer. 

 

Mystery Monday

The wallflowers of the libraries are those books that languish on the shelves unread and ignored.  Well-reviewed, (or they wouldn't be in the library), they are not sought out by readers, but may be stumbled upon by happenstance, a possible delightful discovery for someone.  What makes someone take a chance on an unknown mystery?  Is it an attractive cover, intriguing jacket copy, or a rave review from a favorite mystery author?  Do people stick to certain sub-genres, i.e. police procedurals, British cozies, dog mysteries?  Or, do they read omnivorously, picking anything that appeals at that moment?  What sort of reader are you?  Do you read strictly off the best seller list, reserving all your choices in advance? Do you depend on serendipity, enjoying the thrill of finding a really great book all by yourself? 
Below are some of these wallflower mystery authors, some suggested by members of the Investigating Mysteries book discussion group. Take one out and have yourself a good time.

FOR THE ONE WHO HAS ALWAYS READ AND NEVER LISTENED

So you've never listened to an audiobook before?  Now is the time.  I first broke down and listened to my initial audiobook when I was making a series of long car rides and needed something to break up the monotony.  It took just one, and now I find myself listening every time I am in the car, cleaning, or cooking.  It makes time go by so much faster during a mundane task.  Everyone who has listened to an audiobook in the car has found themselves at their destination and still sitting listening because they are at "a good part".  This month I would like to suggest to you a few audiobooks that I would recommend for the uninitiated.

Life of Pi  by Yann Martel
Snow Flower and the Secret Fan by Lisa See
Family Tree by Barbara Delinsky
Sellevision by Augusten Burroughs
On Chesil Beach by Ian McEwan

These titles are available on CD, Playaway and as digital audiobooks.

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