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Donations - Check it Out

So you've finally gotten around to some serious decluttering. College graduates are moving out, high school seniors have their college acceptances or you might be downsizing.  Are you wondering what to do with those old college textbooks, best sellers from back in the nineties, more than gently used paperbacks or favorite bedtime story books?  Many people don't want to throw books away.  You might think the best place is to drop them off at the library.  We appreciate your good intentions but we really can't accept them.  Very few donations are added to the collection; some might make it onto our 'Littlest Bookstore" shelves.  Sadly, the majority are carted off by the custodial staff for recycling.  We can suggest you call local hospitals, hospice, goodwill or local senior centers.  A search on the internet may turn up sites that pick up books left curbside.  New City Library no longer holds book sales, but other libraries in the county do and might accept your donations.  Some phone numbers you might find useful:  Goodwill, 624-0187, Salvation Army 620-7200.   

Summer Newsletter

The Summer 2013 newsletter is out!  Hard copies are available at the library, and you can also access it online here.  We're using a different email manager to distribute the newsletter now, so if you have not received yours, please be sure to sign up for future mailings.  As always, any questions, please call the reference desk at x125 or x126.

Updated Mobile App for Overdrive

Overdrive Media Console, the app that enables you to check out our e-books, has been updated to v2.6.5.  Due to a change in Apple's privacy policies, iOS users will be asked to re-authorize with their Adobe ID.  After you have updated the app, you will be prompted to enter your Adobe ID and password.  Android users are not affected by this update.  Any questions, please call the reference desk at x125 or x126. 

Better Than Google

In today's topsy turvy financial world, investors have a right to be nervous.  How to invest and what to invest in is a big dilemma for most of us.  Where does one turn for the right advice?  Since 1965, the answer to that question is Value Line.  According to their website, their mission is "to provide investors with the most accurate and independently created research information available, in any format they choose, and teach them how to use it effectively to help meet their financial objectives". Well, for many years, that format was print only.  That was fine for a long time, but there were drawbacks: Only one person could use it at a time, there were three different volumes to look through, and issues could be delayed in the mail or even stolen.  When I previewed the on-line version, I was impressed.  Patrons could use it at home or at work, mutual funds were included, and the print-outs of the reports was sharp and clear, better than a photocopy.

Pixies in the Drawing Room: Gaslamp Fantasy

Frances Griffiths and fairy, 1917I've discussed historical-set speculative fiction in the past, specifically the popularity of steampunk and the weird West.  Today I'd like to introduce you to steampunk's fey cousin, gaslamp fantasy.  If you like fantasy and you enjoy period novels, gaslamp fantasy will be right up your cobblestoned alley.  Think of it as urban fantasy with a 19th-century twist.

The term "gaslamp fantasy" covers fantasy fiction set in the Regency, Victorian, and Edwardian eras, though some will stretch the definition as far as the early years of the 20th century, up the first World War.  While steampunk found its origins in the likes of Jules Verne, H. G. Wells, and the innovative marvels of the Industrial Age, gaslamp fantasy's wonders generally stem from more uncanny sources.

Interim Director Appointed

At a special meeting of the New City Library trustees Tuesday night, the board unanimously voted to appoint Maurice J. (Mitch) Freedman as interim director of the library. This action alleviates concerns about the library's charter and marks a turning point in the working relations between board members. Freedman served as the director of the Westchester Library System for 23 years and as president of the American Library Association in 2002. Since his retirement, Freedman has worked for his publishing company, the U*N*A*B*A*S*H*E*D Librarian. In addition, he has spoken at conferences, served on numerous boards, and has taken on the roles of interim director at the Purchase Free and Nyack libraries.

What's Cooking?: Breakfast Lovers

Do you love breakfast more than any other meal? There is nothing like waking up leisurely to the smell of freshly brewed coffee with the sound of sizzling crisp bacon, fried eggs over easy and well-seasoned home fried potatoes. Added to this dreamy breakfast are baked blackberry muffins with a pecan streusel topping, flaky orange cranberry scones and decadent cinnamon sticky buns floating out of the oven onto the table. This picturesque meal beckons me to come out of my luxurious sleep.  Maybe I'm still dreaming…

Teens Distribute Trees for Arbor Day

 

This past week encompassed Earth Day and National Arbor Day.  In celebration of these days, teens from the Library Youth Board distributed spruce trees to library residents.  In the past several years, hurricanes and snow storms have damaged and destroyed large numbers of trees in our area.  Spruces are not usually eaten by deer and provide a lovely green color throughout  the winter.  The above volunteers are Erin O'Shea, Brendan O'Shea, Ronith Reddy, Nithin Binu and Nevin Binu.

Second Chances

Have you ever said or done something you later regretted?  Or worse, have you not said or done something, and spent the rest of your life wondering how things might have been different "if only..."?  Even if you're content with the choices you've made, it can be hard to let go of some of those missed opportunities.  And if you're not entirely happy, those poor decisions and unresolved endings can really haunt you.

Now imagine the regret in question is a person you once loved.  What do you do when that once-special someone suddenly walks back into your life?  It could be that friend you crushed on in college, but never had the courage to approach.  He's single now... and he's moving into your building.  Perhaps it's your ex-- he's in recovery from the very issues that drove you away, and he's looking for a fresh start.  Sure, you could ignore him, and let the history between you keep you apart.  (After all, you had good reasons for breaking up with him in the first place, right?)  Or....

What's a parent to do?

Feeling overwhelmed?  Too many issues with little ones and too few answers?  Come on in to the Children's Department and take a look at our Parenting Collection.  All the books on those shelves address a common childhood issue.  A few of our picture books in this section include: One Special Day, a story for big brothers & sisters by Lola Schaefer, which talks about a new baby coming into the family; Melanie Walsh's Living with mom and living with dad describes a young child experiencing shared custody; Good-by, Sheepie by Robert Burleigh deals with the loss of a family pet; and My grandpa by Marta Altes is the story of a young bear whose grandpa is getting forgetful. 

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