Better Than Google

Technology moves faster than a superhero.  I heard a quote the other day “that technology used to change every one to two years, now its one to two days”!  How can one keep up with this impossibly quick pace?  No sooner have you mastered Word 2010, here comes Word 2013, which is significantly different from its earlier incarnation.  Innovations are being implemented every day, and it seems there is no way to keep up.

How can we help?  Then library staff offers wildly popular computer and device classes, but there are never enough of them.  Stymied by a lack of a dedicated computer lab, we have cobbled together a de facto computer lab in the conference room using eight laptops.  Thanks must certainly go to our patient and brilliant librarians, Veronica Reynolds and Brian Jennings who teach these classes, despite other pressing responsibilities (Head of Community Relations and Local History Librarian, respectively).

Better Than Google

Remember the Rolodex? If you're no longer in the first flush of youth, you probably do.  It was a handy little tool for keeping track of what you needed to know, such as contact information, handy facts (e.g. the longitude and latitude of New City) and other things you needed to have at your finger tips. Of course, it was a useful little place for librarians to jot down and keep those important bits and pieces of miscellanea for ourselves and our colleagues.  Naturally, it had to be updated for currency.  One year, due to my neat handwriting, I was chosen for this important task.  While New City remains at the same location, other information had to be checked to make sure it was still correct.  I regret to say that I never finished my task and that was partly due to the arrival of the Internet.

The Age of Love

Have you ever wondered how old the heroine is in that romance you're reading? 

In a historical romance, that's an easy question to answer: unless she's a widow or a spinster, she's probably under 25.  Historically, women were married off at a much younger age than they are today.  A Regency lady was considered "on the shelf" (no longer marriageable) by 25.  Medieval and Renaissance heroines are 18-plus only as a concession to modern sensibilities; the average medieval woman was already a mother by the age of 17.

But what about contemporaries?  I'm going to continue to use the age of marriage as a benchmark-- a contemporary romance doesn't have to end in a proposal, but it's still a pretty standard HEA ("Happily Ever After").  If New Adult romance heroines (18-24) are "younger than average," that would suggest that "average" is going to be 25 or older.  But how much older?  Do they track with the age of their readership? Older? Younger?

Rock the garden!!

Time to play in the dirt---or better yet -- help clean up and plant in the Children's Garden! Sign up at the children's desk by phone or in person. Our Garden Rockers Club registration is under way. The Clarkstown Garden Club ladies will be on hand to teach us about weeds and flowers and help us with the garden. Registration is open to families, kids, teens, seniors -- everybody who loves to dig in the dirt and see things grow. Our Spring meeting dates are Thursdays May 7 & 14 at 5:30, Saturday May 30 & Sunday May 31 at 2:00pm. Our Children's GardenTea Party will be June 5 & 6 from 2-4:00pm both days to thank our volunteers. Please join us!

Rock Out at Your Library for National Library Week

You may not know this, but libraries love parody videos! Check out just a few from around the country:

From Orange County library:

From Topeka Library:

And from the Nashville Library:

National Library Week April 12-18

Beginning Sunday, we will be celebrating National Library Week.  Since its inception in 1958, this week in April has been designated by the American Library Association as a time to honor libraries and library workers as well as raise awareness of the vital part libraries play in American culture and democracy.  Please be sure to drop by and enjoy one of the many programs we have scheduled for the week.  See you then!

April 2015 Local History Newsletter

There are many interesting programs related to Local History at the New City Library in April.  James Cassetta will be discussing his new book on Pearl River on Tuesday April 14th at 7PM.   Larry Kigler will show us 125 years of Rockland County history with the help of extensive postcard collection on Tuesday April 28th at 7PM in an illustrated lecture.   Local history newsletterLearn more about these programs and other activities related to local history in the latest edition of our local history newsletter.  Sign up for regular emails related to local history collections and programs here: https://madmimi.com/signups/122327/join.

Nooks Recharged

Are you on a queue waiting for hot new titles such as The Girl on the Train or Dead Wake:  The Last Crossing of the Lusitania?  You might consider checking out one of our Nooks.  Each one is pre-loaded with dozens of bestselling titles in both fiction and nonfiction.  All you have to do is turn them on - no downloading required!  They are perfect for travel or for taking a test drive of the e-reading experience.  Here are the latest titles added:

Announcement of the Departure of Dr. Mitch Freedman

Dr. Maurice J. (Mitch) Freedman announced his resignation as Director of the New City Library effective March 19, 2015.  He has served in this capacity for nearly two years.

During his tenure at New City, Dr. Freedman provided leadership, energy, and expertise needed by the New City Library and helped restore a positive image which was waning prior to his joining the Library.  Under his direction, the Library restructured the audiovisual department, refreshed the Children’s Room and upgraded the technology of the main meeting space. The deterioration of the physical plant was addressed with seven of the eight roofs redone and numerous other needed repairs completed or begun. 

Dr. Freedman also contracted with Library consultants who are working with the Library staff to develop a new five-year plan which will guide the Library into the future. His passion for perfection led him to ensure the Library’s future not only in function, but in encouraging the staff both in spirit and in action. Dr. Freedman was rightly proud that so many patrons come to the library each Thursday specifically for the Director’s Film Series which he initiated.

Better Than Google

Many of you savvy investors out there are familiar with Value Line, but how many of you are aware how it began?   Did you know that the real bottom dropped out of the stock market, not in the intial crash of 1929, but in 1932, when stocks were worth only 10% of their pre-crash value?  A young employee of Moody's at the time, was horrifed that his mother's entire nest egg was wipedout, and soon he was out of a job. Noting that there was no system for rating stocks, he decided to work on his theory of value line rating. This young man, Arnold Bernhard, decided to "find and disclose a standard of normal value which would so enlighten the investing public that the extremes of 1929 and 1932 could never again be repeated."  Thus, Value Line was born. Value Line is available through our database page, and has proved immensely popular with our patrons.  It is easy to use and includes all the great features, and more, that has made Value Line the gold standard for today's investors.

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