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July Fiction Audiobooks

BCD Bachman
     The Long Walk
by Stephen King writing as Richard Bachman.  Read by Kirby Heyborne.  9 discs.  11 hours.

BCD Science Fiction Bacigalupi
     The Windup Girl
by Paolo Bacigalupi.  Read by Jonathan Davis.  16 discs.  19+ hours.

BCD Black
     White Cat
by Holly Black.  Read by Jesse Eisenberg.  6 discs.  6+ hours.

BCD Brashares
    My Name is Memory
by Ann Brashares.  Read by Kathe Mazur and Lincoln Hoppe.  9 discs.  11 hours.

BCD Brown
     Executive Intent
by Dale Brown.  Read by William Dufris.  10 discs.  12 hours

BCD Butcher
     Changes
by Jim Butcher.  Read by James Marsters.  13 discs.  16 hours.

BCD Caletti
     Honey, Baby, Sweetheart
by Deb Caletti.  Read by Amanda Ronconi.  7 discs.  7+ hours.

New DVD Releases For June 29th

We have five new releases for Tuesday, June 26th.  They are:

Bluebeard (Foreign Film - French)

Crazies, The (Horror)

Hot Tub Time Machine (John Cusack)

Percy Jackson & the Olympians: The Lightning Thief (Children's)

White Ribbon, The (Foreign Film - German)

New Mysteries July 2010

Far Cry by John Harvey
Case of the Man who Died Laughing by Tarquin Hall
Cut, Paste, Kill by Marshall Karp
Cutthroat Business by Bente Gallagher
Justice in June by Barbara Levenson
Bedlam by Laura Joh Rowland
Set Sail for Murder by R.T. Jordan
Stranger in the Family by Robert Barnard
Speak no Evil by Martyn Waites
Grace Under Pressure by Julie Hyzy
Death in Show by Judi McCoy
Burning Wire by Jeffery Deaver
Sizzling Sixteen by Janet Evanovich
Murder of Crows by P.F. Chisholm
Colourful Death by Carola Dunn
Where Death Delights by Bernard Knight
Anniversary Man by R.J. Ellroy
Bohemian Girl by Kenneth Cameron

REMEMBER WHEN

The other day a colleague and I, with a combined total of 40 years at the New City Library, most of it in the Circulation Department, were being questioned by an eager “newhi” (new hire). She was curious about some of the changes we experienced over the years. Do you remember the IBM cards that we used in the eighties? We still get returns with those cards. Just to let you know, we probably don’t want those books back. Computers were introduced in the library in 1991, and we began hand-stamping due dates on index cards. I wonder who thought this was an improvement! We had four different colors to signify the different loan periods in use at the time. Yes, I know some of you still miss them. And the lines! Sometimes, especially after school and on weekends, they would stretch into what is now the comfortable seating area; there were only two terminals at the desk. Our newly renovated Circulation desk has five checkouts, two of which are express self-checks. In the early '90s, all the patron reserves were on a desktop carousel. We’d have about 30-40 reserves at a time.

NORWEGIAN ARCHIVE

I found a new site, Digital Archives of Norway, that might be of help to genealogists and researchers. This site is continuing to grow with added information. At no fee, you can look at several censuses, parish records, photos of farm and tutorials on Norwegian research. It was chosen by the current Internet Genealogy as one of the "130 Best Genealogy Websites". Don't be turned off as initially it is in Dutch but there is an option for English translation.

                                       http://digitalarkivet.uib.no/

 

WHERE THE DEER AND THE ANTELOPE PLAY: HISTORICAL WESTERN ROMANCE

It's summer!  Are you ready?  (Me neither.)  But the 4th of July is nearly upon us, and luckily, the romance collection stands ready to get us into a patriotic mood.  This month, I thought we'd return to our survey of historical romances with a look at the American Old West.  After all, what says "independence" better than a cowboy? 

The period of westward expansion during latter 19th and early 20th centuries has captured the romantic imagination more than any other period in American history.  It's not surprising; from a Romance perspective, the West has got it all: tall tales, rugged men, and strong women.  Majestic mountains, sweeping vistas, and skies glittering with stars.  The promise of riches, cultures in conflict, and men in black hats.  The pioneer spirit, taming a wild land with nothing but human strength and wits.  Civilization overcoming lawlessness.  The shining promise of the Industrial Age. 

So... are you ready for a taste of independence?  Saddle up, ladies, we're headed for the frontier!  HYAH!

NEW CITY LIBRARY OFFERS DOWNLOADABLE MUSIC FROM OUR WEBSITE

New City Library has joined the Library Ideas’ Network that offers access to songs from Sony Music’s catalog of legendary artists.

The service will allow New City Customers to increase the size and diversity of its collection by offering access to hundreds of thousands of songs.

New DVD Releases for June 22nd

We have five new releases for Tuesday June22nd. They are:

For My Father (Foreign Film - In Hebrew & Arabic)

Green Zone (Greg Kinnear)

Last Station, The (Helen Mirren & Christopher Plummer)

Remember Me (Pierce Brosnan & Chris Cooper)

She's Out of My League

 

 

 

Mystery Monday

Last month I discussed the incredible story of Stieg Larsson, the Swedish author who wrote the Millenium Trilogy (The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, The Girl who Played with Fire and The Girl who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest).  It is no exaggeration to say that they have become a publishing  sensation, selling 35 million copies worldwide.  Those of you who have read and enjoyed the trilogy might be pining for some more Nordic noir, and those who are waiting to read them might want to try something else in the meantime. Luckily, there is no shortage of atmospheric Scandinavian mysteries, and I have compiled a list of some terrific authors who may inspire you to put on a big pot of coffee and cool off with an icy mystery.

Henning Mankell--One of the most successful Swedish authors, he is best known for the highly-regarded Kurt Wallander series.  Wallander, also called the Swedish Morse, is a middle-aged police inspector with a load of personal problems and a gloomy outlook on society, but the books are justifably popular.

2010 Census

There has been much interest amongt the public regarding the collecting of data for the 2010 census. For genealogists, the information is important but the wait to view the information is 72 years! To clarify, this is the first federal census that is all-electronic and will affect the format in which permanent records are preserved. The Census Bureau will scan the respondent questionnaires as part of its business process for compiling the census. The draft schedule calls for the permanent retention of the scanned digital images. These scanned images are the 21st equivalent to the microfilm copies of census forms generated for previous decennial censuses.

In addition, the Census Bureau is also proposing permanent retention for the unedited file containing response data, with linkage information to the scanned images. This means that once the census is opened to the public 72 years from the enumeration date of the 2010 census, genealogists will have two means of searching for their ancestors. The will be able to search the database from the respondent forms or directly retrieve images from the forms themselves.

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