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Mystery Monday

Why do we read mysteries?  If you are reading this blog, it can be assumed that you like mysteries.  An interesting thread on Librarything discussed why people read mysteries, and there were some interesting theories.

1. We love to see people being punished for their evil deeds, and generally, mysteries accomplish this with the guilty being punished, or at least, arrested.

2. We love puzzles, figuring thngs out, and mysteries certainly contain puzzles.

3. Many mystery writers are superb at characterization, as well as plotting, and are just some of the best writers around.

4. In a long running series we become invested in our favorite characters like Stephanie Plum, Peter Decker and Alan Banks.

5. Mysteries explore the mind and actions of people who do terrible things and it satisfies our need to understand the human condition.

Do any of these reasons resonate with you?  Maybe you just like to settle in with any engrossing book and here are a few you mignt want to check out.

Monster in the Box by Ruth Rendell.  Inspector Wexford returns and we get some intriguing looks into his past.

BENEATH OUR FEET

We often look to speculative fiction to take us on journeys to distant galaxies, to transport us to far, fey kingdoms or realms of nightmare.  But there's a strange, lost land hiding much closer than we might suspect-- every day, in cities all around the world, humanity treads unthinkingly over it.  Those seemingly solid streets we drive on every day?  Hollow.  Buildings, sidewalks, even parks stretch over spacious caverns of air.  Although this sounds fantastical, I haven't even gotten to the "fiction" part yet-- read on! 

HISTORICAL STUMPER ANSWER

On November 3, I presented an historical stumper that showed a military insignia patch on display in our current exhibit and challenged the reader to identify it. I promised to reveal the answer a week later!

The answer is the 81st "Wildcat" Infantry Division and is generally credited with having the first shoulder patch as we know it today. The unit trained in  Camp (now Fort) Jackson, South Carolina along the banks of the Wildcat Creek. When the division disembarked in France in 1918, they were wearing a shoulder patch that depicted a black wildcat on OD background. This caused a stir among the Staff types in France and the troops were first ordered to remove the patch. But with the insight of forward looking staff officers, General Pershing decided that this concept could have great positive morale aspect among the troops. He then ordered all units to come up with a design that could be made into a patch for their respective organization. This opened the floor-gates for every outfit and today we have this concept throughout the military establishments of the world.

Coming in March

Fiction
Aciman, André. Eight White Nights
From the writer of Out of Eygpt.

A passionate love story that takes place over the course of seven days.  A 20-year old man meets a young woman at a Christmas party, they continue to meet every day at the cinema, tension building, until New Year's Eve arrives.

Childs, Laura. The Teaberry Strangler: A Tea Shop Mystery

The bestselling author of "Oolong Dead" serves up an Old-World treat, spiced with a Sherlock Holmes-style murder mystery.

Caught- 17-year-old Haley McWaid is a good girl, the pride of her suburban New Jersey family, captain of the lacrosse team, headed off to college next year with all the hopes and dreams her doting parents can pin on her. Which is why, when her mother wakes one morning to find that Haley never came home the night before, and three months quickly pass without word from the girl, the community assumes the worst.

Coben, Harlan. Caught.

Coming in February

Fiction

Ault, Sandi. Wild Penance: A Wild Mystery.

Agent Jessica Wild witnesses a bizarre murder, which she begins to suspect is the work of Los Penitentes, a secret, ancient religious group that reenacts Jesus' crucifixion and practices excessive penance.

Balogh, Mary. A Matter of Class.

Lady Annabelle Ashton and Reginald Mason are forced to marry each other for different reasons.

Bova, Ben. Able One.

The United States is depending on Able One , a modified 747 with missile-bending laser capabilities and an untested crew, to defend the country against North Korea's nuclear missiles.

Coming in January

Fiction

Benjamin, Melanie. Alice I Have Been.

A novel about the life of Alice Liddell Hargreaves, the inspiration behind Alice in Wonderland.

Bloom, Amy. Where the God of Love Hangs Out.

Boyle, T.C. Wild Child: and other stories.

A collection of stories by TC Boyle.  The title story centers around Victor, the feral child discovered in France, during the Napoleonic times.

Burcell, Robin. The Bone Chamber

The second novel featuring the main character forensic artist, Sydney Fitzpatrick.  Fitzpatrick is asked to recreate the face of a murdered young women and then finds herself on a quest to find the killer.
 

Chevalier, Tracy. Remarkable Creatures.

New DVD Releases For November 10th

We have two new DVD releases for Tuesday, November 10th.  They are:

The Ugly Truth (Katherine Heigl)

Up (Children's DVD)

The Colonel Listens to Audiobooks. Do You?


Click to enlarge.

The Colonel recommends listening to The Fighting 69th: one remarkable National Guard unit's journey from Ground Zero to Baghdad by Sean Michael Flynn, and Where Men Win Glory: the odyssey of Pat Tillman by Jon Krakauer.

New Large Print for November 2009

 

Have a Little Faith by Mitch Albom

There Goes the Bride by M.C. Beaton

Hot Pursuit by Suzanne Brockmann

The Lost Symbol by Dan Brown

Nine Dragons by Michael Connelly

South of Broad by Pat Conroy

The Case of the Missing Servant by Tarquin Hall

The Physick Book of Deliverance Dane by Katherine Howe

Pilgrims by Garrison Keillor

Blindman's Bluff by Faye Kellerman

Evidence by Jonathan Kellerman

The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo by Stieg Larsson

Eleanor the Queen by Norah Lofts

Bride on the Loose by Debbie Macomber

Razor Sharp by Fern Michaels

Little Bird of Heaven by Joyce Carol Oates

The Professional by Robert B. Parker

The Spire by Richard North Patterson

Hardball by Sara Paretskey

New Music Releases November 2009

 

Alice In Chains.  Black Gives Way To Blue                                                         MR ALI BGW V59

All Time Low.  Nothing Personal                                                                      MR ALL NP H10

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